WA Day long weekend at Kalbarri

Dear members,

The long awaited Kalbarri trip is just around the corner: Friday 1st to Monday 4th June 2018.

 

Remi on Keith Goes Blank 15***

Sheer sandstone walls carved out by the Murchison River provide trad, sport climbing, bouldering and deep water soloing opportunities. Roughly 6.5 hour drive north of Perth, Kalbarri gorge is well worth the trip. Kalbarri National Park provides opportunities for trad leading in the middle and upper grades and sport climbing at a high level. You couldn’t ask for a more picturesque setting. If you haven’t been before, Kalbarri gorge is truly spectacular and just a great spot to spend a weekend. Winter is prime climbing time in the gorge with excellent friction, pleasant temperatures and no flies.

Though the areas around the Z Bend tend to attract most climbers, there is some moderate trad climbing out at Hawk’s Head. Four Ways is also another great alternative if you want to avoid the crowd, whilst the remote Wonderwall offers some deep water soloing fun and is a pleasant day hike.

We would love to see you all there. We also need to make sure that everyone is clear about what to expect of the area. Kalbarri is not an ideal venue for beginners, unless they are accompanied by a suitably experienced climber. This is because access to routes will usually require lead climbing and the ability to set up top ropes is very limited. The climbing also tends to be moderate to very hard.

Guides
The main guides to the area are Northern Rock and West Australian Rock. These will give you a good idea of the climbing on offer. More routes have been posted on the forum since the above publications, here are some of them:

A couple of new Kalbarri routes

Kalbarri long natural line

20 new routes in Kalbarri

Kalbarri – new route in the Pit

New routes in Kalbarri

New crack climbs at kalbarri

Access
From Perth, head north to Geraldton, Northampton and Kalbarri. The road out to the Z Bend is now sealed and accessible by 2WD.

Weather
Check the weather forecast to choose your clothing appropriately: if the forecast announces less than 15 degrees and windy, bring that down jacket as it can be very cold in the gorge. Sunscreen can be life saver as well if you’re planning to climb multi-pitches.

Accommodation
We have unpowered camping sites provisionally booked nearby Kalbarri Township. A deposit is required to secure the camping so please let us know numbers as soon as possible if you plan to attend, thus we can ensure that we have enough space to accommodate everybody.

Registering Your Interest Now
Please register by completing the online form ASAP and by noon Friday 25th May. We will then send confirmation with further details.

——

Please note that CAWA trips are a benefit for members. Joining online is easy, through the link on the CAWA home page.

If you have any questions, please email both Gareth (garethw@climberswa.asn.au) who will be in Kalbarri to coordinate the trip and Remi (remiv@climberswa.asn.au) who is helping with the preparation ahead of the long weekend.

Remi Vignals & Gareth Wood

CAWA Committee member

——-

Due to legal and liability issues, CAWA does not provide training on trips. All climbers must be independent participants who are completely responsible for themselves. If you are an inexperienced climber, then have a chat to some of the more experienced people you know and see if they are planning to attend.

Kalbarri – Climbers’ responsibilities

G’day climbers,

With winter, comes Kalbarri season! Here is a reminder of our responsibilities up there.

1- Remember that no toilet waste is allowed within 500m of the Promenade / Rock wallaby site. Therefore, it’s best to use the toilet facilities at the Z Bend carpark before hiking down the gorge.

No toilet waste area around The Promenade site.

2- Since the rediscovery of the rare Black Footed Rock Wallabies in 2015, camping is not permitted in the gorge within 1.5Km of the Z Bend Lookout – this includes the area around the Promenade climbing site.

3- However, there is a camping area near the Z Bend car park that is set aside for school groups, but the privilege is also extended to climbers. We are, however, on thin ice here so please register by completing the multi-day registration form and emailing it to either Mike Paxman mike.paxman@dpaw.wa.gov.au (Senior Ranger) or Lisa Gould lisa.gould@dpaw.wa.gov.au.

4- Climbers new to Kalbarri may phone the ranger to get directions to the alternate camping area (it is not sign posted).

Map of the alternative campsite adjacent to the Z Bend carpark

5- Immediately close the gate behind you when driving in and out of the alternative camping area near the Z Bend carpark. The campsite is 200 metres pass the gate. Please stay away from the vegetation regrowth and rehab area (short bushes and trees held up by sticks within the campsite) and do NOT pitch a tent there.

6- The campsite has no water and all rubbish must be taken out of the park. The toilets are situated in the Z Bend carpark area.

7- Due to the elevated risk of bushfire in the sandplain areas no open fires is allowed in the alternative camping area (gas cookers only).

8- Last but not least, remember to limit the use of excess chalk (especially on overhanging walls) and systematically brush it before you leave the site – the same goes for boulderers venturing on virgin rocks! Also, try not to use any  chalk in high traffic areas such as the river trail / Aviary / Tourist wall.

A Park Entry fee of $12 per car and a camping fee of $8 per night per person apply.

The Park Entry can be paid for by credit card on the all-hours machine available at the main entrance of the park (just off Ajana-Kalbarri road). However, the camping fees must be paid for by cash stuffed in an envelope and inserted into the box next to the abovementioned machine.

For those of us who suffer the Tumblagooda Fever and need their regular fix of sandstone, you can wave the car entry fee by opting for the DPAW Annual All Parks Pass (Standard: $92):
https://parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au/know/park-passes

If you are a member of the RAC, you can get 50% off the pass:
https://rac.com.au/travel-touring/wa-holidays/wa-national-park-passes

Leave no trace.

Gareth Wood and Remi Vignals

CAWA Access Sub-committee

The multi-day registration form is now available on the CAWA website:

http://www.climberswa.asn.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Kalbarri-NP-Registration-form-by-CAWA.pdf

 

Business Hours:

Kalbarri National Park Office:     08 9937 1140    –    08 993 7114 (fax)

 

After Hours:

Senior Ranger:                        08 9937 1192    –    0417 181 314 (mob)

Ranger:                                  08 9937 1424    –    0427 199 518 (mob)

 

 

 

Kalbarri Trip Report – June 2017

The 2017 CAWA trip to Kalbarri was held over the WA Day long weekend in June. Remi, Elizabeth, Mark, Debbie and Anna set off in convoy on Friday morning from Perth, stopping at Jurien Bay for lunch where we met Benjamin, who was about to have his first climbing experience at one of the best climbing destinations in Western Australia. This group, plus Andrew, the keen boulderer from Geraldton, arrived at Murchison House Station in the evening and set up camp next to the river. Andrew won our hearts by promptly and efficiently making a fire and we settled down to drink, eat and toast marshmallows, all the while accompanied by a splish-splosh soundtrack of fish mysteriously jumping about in the river below.

Debbie on 9-6=3. A popular trad 15 at the Adventure Wall.

By Saturday morning we had been joined by Kate, Bruno, Jorge, Squeak, Craig and Antony. We set off for the Z-Bend and hiked into the gorge, complete with two bouldering mats, the largest of which was imposed on newcomer Benjamin in something resembling a bizarre initiation rite. Luckily, he had come equipped with fully two litres of milk to help him endure this ordeal. For some of us the day was spent at the Adventure Wall where top ropes were set up on “6-9=3” and “Peanut Butter and Jam” for some of the less experienced climbers to have a dangle around. Remi led “Hmmm…” and gallantly belayed at least three people up after him. Meanwhile Mark and Elizabeth played around on “Rattler”, with varying degrees of success. The youngest member of the party, Anna, fell, fully dressed, into the river.

Elizabeth on Rattler 22**

 

Ben first initiation to Rock Climbing

The evening was spent around the campfire, cooking damper and discussing the pitfalls and tribulations of a certain online dating service. Poor Antony, who had spent the day lying comatose on the gorge floor, returned from the Kalbarri hospital with a diagnosis of bowel infection and some pharmaceuticals. Benjamin had left us to embark on a sadly fruitless fishing expedition.

Poor Antony feeling ill at the Adventure Wall

Day Two of climbing saw us turn right at the bottom of the descent gully into the gorge and make our way to the Phantom Wall. Remi set up some top rope anchors on some of his ridiculously sandbagged routes in order to make everyone feel dejected while Mark led “Wombat Amnesia”, followed by Andrew, who made some very strange noises and left a creditable amount of blood on the wall but arrived at the top convinced, we think, of the merits of climbing rocks that are bigger than boulders. While Remi put on his mountain guide cap once again and belayed Craig, Debbie and Squeak up “Wombat Amnesia”, Elizabeth exhausted herself on Scoops of Fruits (20) and decided that she definitely didn’t want to lead it, followed by Kate and Mark who were of the same mind. We watched Bruno and Jorge  struggling to place gear on “Flipping Berries” (allegedly 18) as they loudly cursed the man who had established the line.

Remi sandbagging himself on Flipping Berries 18*

Next on the agenda was a quick skinny-dip in the nearby swimming hole before hiking out of the gorge towards dinner and beer. That evening was spent being entertained by the hitherto unrevealed talents of Bruno, who, it turns out, has a certain amount of skill in the art of animal imitation. Urged on by the exhortations of the expedition’s 8-year-old, he gave us impressions of almost every imaginable beast, from butterfly to numbat to onion mite.

On Monday morning we broke up camp and set off south towards Perth via Geraldton, where most of the crew reconvened one last time for burgers. On the journey home, outgoing CAWA president Mark and family took their last opportunity to visit the Pinnacles before leaving WA, and Elizabeth and Remi tagged along.

The predominant revelation of the weekend was that Remi, our trip organiser, has missed his vocation as a climbing guide. His enthusiasm for, and knowledge of climbing in Kalbarri is possibly unparalleled and his patience and planning helped made the weekend enjoyable for everyone.

Trip report by Elizabeth Gralton.

CAWA Family Lunch at the Adventure Wall

 

Remi on Keith Goes Blank 15***

Photo Credits: Andrew Outhwaite

Foundation Day Long Weekend at Kalbarri

Dear members,

The long awaited Kalbarri trip is just around the corner: Friday 2nd to Monday 5th June 2017.

Sebastian Fuller on Keith Goes Blank 15*** at the Tourist Wall, Z Bend.

Sheer sandstone walls carved out by the Murchison River provide trad, sport climbing, bouldering and deep water soloing opportunities. Roughly 6.5 hour drive north of Perth, Kalbarri gorge is well worth the trip. Kalbarri National Park provides opportunities for trad leading in the middle and upper grades and sport climbing at a high level. You couldn’t ask for a more picturesque setting. If you haven’t been before, Kalbarri gorge is truly spectacular and just a great spot to spend a weekend. Winter is prime climbing time in the gorge with excellent friction, pleasant temperatures and no flies.

Though the areas around the Z Bend tend to attract most climbers, there is some moderate trad climbing out at Hawk’s Head. Four Ways is also another great alternative if you want to avoid the crowd, whilst the remote Wonderwall offers some deep water soloing fun and is a pleasant day hike.

We would love to see you all there. We also need to make sure that everyone is clear about what to expect of the area. Kalbarri is not an ideal venue for beginners, unless they are accompanied by a suitably experienced climber. This is because access to routes will usually require lead climbing and the ability to set up top ropes is very limited. The climbing also tends to be moderate to very hard.

Guides
The main guides to the area are Northern Rock and West Australian Rock. These will give you a good idea of the climbing on offer. More routes have been posted on the forum since the above publications, here are some of them:
http://www.climberswa.asn.au/topic/a-couple-of-new-kalbarri-routes/
http://www.climberswa.asn.au/topic/kalbarri-long-natural-line/
http://www.climberswa.asn.au/topic/20-new-routes-in-kalbarri/
http://www.climberswa.asn.au/topic/kalbarri-new-route-in-the-pit/
http://www.climberswa.asn.au/topic/new-routes-in-kalbarri/

Access
From Perth, head north to Geraldton, Northampton and Kalbarri. The road out to the Z Bend is now sealed for the first twelve kilometres. The remaining section can be in variable conditions but accessible by 2WD.

Weather
Check the weather forecast to choose your clothing appropriately: if the forecast announces less than 15 degrees and windy, bring that down jacket as it can be very cold in the gorge. Sunscreen can be life saver as well if you’re planning to climb multi-pitches.

Accommodation
We will most likely book unpowered camping sites nearby Kalbarri Township. A deposit is required to secure the camping so please let me know numbers as soon as possible if you plan to attend, thus I can ensure that we have enough space to accommodate everybody.

Registering Your Interest
Please register by completing the online form ASAP. I will then send confirmation with further details.


Please note that CAWA trips are a benefit for members. Joining online is easy, through the link on the CAWA home page.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me by email: remiv@climberswa.asn.au.

Remi Vignals

CAWA Committee member


Due to legal and liability issues, CAWA does not provide training on trips. All climbers must be independent participants who are completely responsible for themselves. If you are an inexperienced climber, then have a chat to some of the more experienced people you know and see if they are planning to attend.

Gym Crash at The Boulder Hub – 11/08/2016 @ 6.30pm

 

Dear CAWA Members,

The next CAWA Gym Crash will be held at the Boulder Hub in Wangara on Thursday the 11th of August from 6:30pm. Bouldering of all styles and levels are offered.

Bouldering doesn’t require a rope, a harness and not even a climbing buddy, having said that I would love to see more women attend. Sadly women were significantly outnumbered by men at the last gym crash. So if you have never bouldered, this is the perfect opportunity to give it a try and meet some new faces.

CAWA will also be offering a tasty Nandos dinner for the discounted price of $7. I will be taking orders at 7pm on the night, so please come see me before then if you would like to be included.

I look forward to seeing you all there. For those that don’t know me, ask one of the gym staff, they will point me out. My bio and pic are also on the CAWA website.

Date: Thursday 11th August 2016
Time: From 6.30pm
Location: The Boulder Hub, 2/1 Venture Loop, Wangara, WA
BYO: Climbing shoes and chalk bag

Kate Bailue
CAWA Treasurer

Comments submitted to The Albany Coast Draft Management Plan 2016

Ryan belayed by Inalee on the classic Take The Plunge 19** - West Cape Howe
Ryan on the classic route called Take The Plunge (grade 19***) at West Cape Howe

 

Dear climbers,

The Albany Coast Draft Management Plan 2016 was released by DPaW for public comments on 9th May 2016. Thanks to several CAWA committee members who scrutinized the plan, CAWA submitted comments on 6th July 2016.

 

BACKGROUND INFORMATION:

The Draft Albany Management Plan covers 56 existing terrestrial parks and reserves totalling 32,457ha (Map 1, Appendix 1 of the plan). The lands are mainly located in the City of Albany, as well as southern parts of the shires of Plantagenet and Jerramungup. Climbing areas covered by the plan include the Gap, Natural Bridge, and Peak Head in the Torndirrup National Park, West Cape Howe in the West Cape Howe National Park and Waychinicup in the Waychinicup National Park.  As it covers such a large area and variety of parks, it is written more strategically than other management plans.

This management plan, once gazetted, will replace all of the below listed plans as the statutory management plan for the parks and reserves within the planning area (including any proposed reserves that become vested with the Conservation Commission):

  • South Coast Regional Management Plan 1992–2002 (CALM 1992a)
  • Two Peoples Bay Nature Reserve Management Plan 1995–2005 (CALM 1995a)
  • West Cape Howe National Park Management Plan 1995–2005 (CALM 1995b)
  • Interim management guidelines for Torndirrup, Gull Rock and Waychinicup national parks, as well as Mount Manypeaks and Arpenteur nature reserves
  • A non-statutory management plan also exists for Cheyne Bay: Cape Riche to Pallinup River (reserves 14986, 14987 and 31240)

Note that the Stirling Range and Porongorups are covered in the Stirling Range and Prongorups Management Plan, and Peak Charles is covered in the Esperance and Recherche Archipelago Management Plan that came into effect last year.  (These were previously covered by the South Coast Regional Management Plan).

The strategic objectives of the Draft Albany Management Plan, which are derived from corporate DPaW objectives and provide overall guidance for the planning area, are:

  • to conserve and protect biodiversity and ecological integrity;
  • to conserve and protect the value of the land to the culture and heritage of Noongar people, and conserve and protect other cultural heritage;
  • to provide for recreation, tourism and community use for the appreciation of the area’s landscape, natural and cultural heritage values; and
  • to provide for sustainable resource use.

For context, the parks and reserves covered by the Management Plan have immense importance for biodiversity, Noongar and other cultural heritage, as well as have spectacular coastal landforms and scenery that attract many visitors, and are an integral part of the greater Albany community.  It will always be a balancing act to maintain the above listed objectives.

As a background, the parks are located within the global biodiversity hot-spot of the South West Botanical Province. The Albany coast area has high conservation value based on the presence of several large and intact protected areas such as the Gull Rock, Torndirrup, Waychinicup and West Cape Howe National Parks and Two Peoples Bay Nature Reserve; areas of high plant species diversity and endemism; and important refuges for threatened fauna (including the critically endangered Gilbert’s potoroo or ngilgyte (Potorous gilbertii) and several endangered ground-dwelling birds, flora and ecological communities.

The plan recognises that recreation (in all its forms) within the planning area mainly occurs along the coastal strip, and the major focus for visitor use is at Torndirrup, West Cape Howe, Gull Rock and Waychinicup national parks and Two Peoples Bay Nature Reserve. While the majority of recreation sites within the planning area are associated with the provision of access to beaches and coastal inlets, and much of the activity at these sites is water based, these coastal parks and reserves also provide:

  • spectacular scenic destinations
  • a rustic, remote and wild sense of place
  • unique and varied landscapes
  • opportunities for numerous nature-based recreation activities and multi-user groups
  • unique natural experiences.

Consequently, the number of visitors to these popular coastal parks and reserves are high. In 2013–14, Torndirrup National Park was the sixth highest visited park/reserve in the State with about 431,528 visits (70% of the combined parks visits), and the most visited reserve in the planning area. ‘The Gap’ and ‘Natural Bridge’ sites within this park attracted about 209,587 visits alone (half of the visits were to the park). In comparison, Two Peoples Bay Nature Reserve received about 107,000 visits, Waychinicup National Park received about 14,500 visits and West Cape Howe National Park received about 49,134 visits.

CAWA recognises that climbing is only one activity of many that occur within the numerous parks covered with the planning area of the Draft Albany Management Plan, but the plan contains several key and very important climbing areas.  This and the consideration of the above mentioned considerations are reflected in CAWA’s submission to DPaW submitted on 6 July 2016.

Download CAWA’s response to the Albany Coast Draft Management Plan – July 2016 (PDF)

Any questions or burning desire to help out with access issues in the future, contact us on access@climberswa.asn.au.

Thanks,
CAWA Access sub-committee

Eaglestone Rock Climbing Trip: 29th – 31st July

Dear Members,

It’s time to grab your winter woollies and pack up your car for a fun-filled climbing weekend to Eaglestone, 3.5 hours east of Perth in the Wheatbelt.

After numerous requests from fellow members this year we will be running a dress-up theme to showcase your best climbing attire. I would like your help choosing a theme, so please vote using the CAWA registration form below.

Voting will close 10 days prior to the trip date (20th July), with the theme chosen by the most votes. Vote carefully as there will be prizes for best climbing costume, best costume of the day and hardest/most routes in your costume!

With approximately 30 bolted, trad and mixed routes there is something for everyone. Eaglestone has large granite boulders with good face climbing. Abseil stations are positioned on top of the major boulders. There are a number of fantastic routes including Wishbone (17**), Capachow (19**), Pink Rings (18*) and Ithica (22**). So be sure to check out your Perth Rock Climbing Guide for route and access information.

Fidget Gene 23**
Richard M. on the classic wide crack of Fidget Gene 23**

Camping at Eaglestone is super easy with the campground only a stone’s throw away from the crag. There is the luxury of a drop toilet, so no need to pack a shovel. However, there are no other facilitates or water so you will need to be completely self-sufficient. A guide of what to bring:

  • Cooking & camping gear, including plenty of water
  • Firewood – there isn’t any to be collected from the ground, so we ask each car to bring firewood (it will be very cold at night, a camp fire will make the weekend infinitely warmer!)
  • Toilet paper
  • Warm clothing for night

You don’t need a 4WD but there is a short section of dirt road followed by a section of good sand track easily accessible by 2WD.

Most people will be travelling there Friday evening or Saturday morning. The Merredin bakery is a must before heading out to Eaglestone Rock, with tasty treats to satisfy your climbing hunger.

Eaglestone is always a fun weekend and a great chance to meet other climbers, so we hope you can join us on the trip.

Please note that CAWA trips are only open to current members. Non-members who are interested in coming can join online here: http://www.climberswa.asn.au/cawa/membership/

Registration is compulsory, so please register using the link provided below if you intend to come along:
http://goo.gl/forms/wH7Fitb8mBhsrgLV2

 

If you have any queries or would like to find out any further information, please don’t hesitate to drop me an email at kateb@climberswa.asn.au

 

 

Kate Bailue

CAWA Treasurer

 

 


Due to legal and liability issues, CAWA does not provide training on trips. All climbers must be independent participants who are completely responsible for themselves. If you are an inexperienced climber, then have a chat to some of the more experienced people you know and see if they are planning to attend.

Kalbarri Update

The Black Flanked Rock Wallaby with its new joey (Photo taken in April 2016)
The Black Flanked Rock Wallaby with its new joey (Photo taken in April 2016)

In this blog post the committee provides a summary of the current status regarding climbing and camping in the Kalbarri National Park (KNP). Within KNP, the area of the Murchison Gorge known as the “Z bend” provides some of the best rock climbing in Western Australia including classic routes such as Keith Goes Blank (15***), Kalbarri Gold (26***) and Swan Song (30***).

Background:

  • In mid-2015, CAWA member Remi Vignals (now elected to the CAWA Committee), who regularly visits the gorge, photographed a couple of Black Flanked Rock Wallabies at the Promenade area of the Z Bend.  Remi quite rightfully reported his sightings and observations to the local ranger.
  • On 8 November 2015, CAWA published a blog post regarding the wallabies at the Promenade.  The post caused some controversy among members.
  • In December 2015, the Department of Park and Wildlife (DPaW) wrote a letter to CAWA, also posted on the CAWA website, confirming that due to the presence of the wallabies, camping would no longer be permitted in the gorge.
  • A further letter dated 18 February 2016 was sent by DPaW to CAWA confirming their proposals for camping for members of CAWA.

On 22 February 2016, the CAWA Annual General Meeting was adjourned due to failure to obtain a quorum.  On 14 March 2015, the new CAWA Committee was elected at the adjourned CAWA Annual General Meeting. It held its first meeting on 23 March 2016 and established a subcommittee in relation to access issues.  The Access Subcommittee’s mandate is to identify and evaluate the access issues faced by WA climbers and bring them to the attention of the Committee.

Since the formation of the Access Subcommittee, the members of the Subcommittee (Dan, Dirk, Nathan, Peter and Remi) have brought up the current arrangements in place in Kalbarri and debated what further actions would be appropriate. The result was a draft letter to DPaW, including feedback on the Draft Code of Conduct and consideration for camping, and proposals to help streamline registration.  The letter was endorsed by the Committee and sent to DPaW on 30 April. We will keep you updated on any further developments.

In the meantime, please note:

  1. Camping is not permitted in the gorge within 1.5Km of the Z Bend Lookout – this includes the area around the Promenade climbing site.
  2. No toilet waste is allowed within 500m of the Promenade / Rock wallaby site.
  3. An alternate car-camping area may be provided in the vicinity of the Z Bend carpark – booking and registration essential. Climbers must phone the ranger to obtain the registration form and get directions to the alternate camping area (it is not sign posted).
  4. Major upgrades to lookouts, roads and visitor infrastructure will cause some disruption this season. Road works are scheduled to start by August 2016 with completion early 2017.


Business Hours:
Kalbarri National Park Office:     08 9937 1140    –    08 993 7114 (fax)

After Hours:
Senior Ranger:                        08 9937 1192    –    0417 181 314 (mob)
Ranger:                                  08 9937 1424    –    0427 199 518 (mob)

Please contact remiv@climberswa.asn.au if you have any further questions.

Alternate camping area
Alternate camping area